Dieser Artikel ging durchs ganze Internet. Matt Honan beschreibt, wie Hacker sein digitales Selbst vollständig übernahmen: Apple Geräte (über iCloud), Google Mail, Twitter, Amazon…

Auf Wired berichtet er etwas ausführlicher dazu. Ursache des Übels (neben fehlenden Backups und 2-Factor Authentication bei Google Mail) war anscheinend der Amazon Tech Support:

First you call Amazon and tell them you are the account holder, and want to add a credit card number to the account. All you need is the name on the account, an associated e-mail address, and the billing address. Amazon then allows you to input a new credit card. (Wired used a bogus credit card number from a website that generates fake card numbers that conform with the industry’s published self-check algorithm.) Then you hang up.

Next you call back, and tell Amazon that you’ve lost access to your account. Upon providing a name, billing address, and the new credit card number you gave the company on the prior call, Amazon will allow you to add a new e-mail address to the account. From here, you go to the Amazon website, and send a password reset to the new e-mail account. This allows you to see all the credit cards on file for the account — not the complete numbers, just the last four digits. But, as we know, Apple only needs those last four digits.

Mit den letzten 4 Stellen der echten Kreditkarte, der Adresse und dem Namen rief der Hacker bei AppleCare an, welche ihm Zugang zum iCloud Account gaben…